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DIY Science Experiment #20 - Volcano Easter Eggs!

Thought a baking soda volcano was fun? Think again with this experiment that uses the same science to reinvent the way we dye easter eggs! 

Materials: Hard boiled eggs, food coloring, vinegar, baking soda, paint brushes, some cups, bowl, cup of water, dropper

  1. Create a baking soda paint using a tablespoon of baking soda, a few teaspoons of water, and food coloring. Mix it up until you get the consistency of paint that you desire.
  2. Start painting your eggs with the paint brushes.
  3. Drop splashes of food coloring onto the eggs using a dropper. 
  4. Pour vinegar on top of each egg and watch the volcanic eruption begin! You can repeat this several times on the same egg.
  5. Pour off the excess vinegar and let them air dry.

How does it work? Baking soda and vinegar chemically react to form carbon dioxide gas, creating the bubbly explosion of color that dyes the eggs so beautifully. 

Read more here

DIY Science Experiment #19 - Easter eggs with natural dyes!

With Easter approaching, try a more eco friendly method to dyeing eggs with the help of a little science!

Materials: Hard boiled eggs, pan, water, vinegar, colorful kitchen items to create natural dyes

Ideas for kitchen items: Brown - strong coffee, Purple - blueberries, Green - spinach leaves, Blue - red cabbage, Orange - yellow onion skins, Yellow - grated carrots, Pink - beets or cranberries

  1. After you have chosen a dye color and gathered your materials, chop or grate the food (fruit or vegetable) that you are using. If you are using liquids, pour several cups of the liquid. 
  2. Add 1 cup of water and 2-3 teaspoons of vinegar for every handful of chopped/grated fruit or vegetable, or add 1 part vinegar to 3 parts of liquid.
  3. Put the mixture in a saucepan and bring to a boil for 5 minutes. 
  4. Strain the dye and let it cool before submerging the hard boiled eggs.
  5. Leave overnight for rich color.

How does it work? The vinegar acts as a mordant. A mordant is a substance that reacts with the dye, changing its chemical bonds so that the dye attaches to the object being dyed. A mordant can also change the color of a dye - so don’t be shy to experiment!

Learn more    Photo Credit

larstheyeti:

the Water Cycle

(via quantumaniac)

DIY Science Experiment #18 - Colorful Dancing Oobleck!

Materials: 2 cups of cornstarch, 1 cup of water, a subwoofer, a thin metal cookie sheet, a few MP3 recordings, food coloring

  1. Place the cookie sheet onto the speaker of the subwoofer. 
  2. Mix the cornstarch and water and pour this mixture onto the cookie sheet.
  3. Download different songs and see what works best for you. It works best to experiment with 40 Hz, 50 Hz, and 63 Hz with the volume turned up. 
  4. While the oobleck is dancing, carefully add drops of your favorite food coloring for a colorful surprise!
  5. Try searching for a subwoofer test MP3 for best results.

How does it work? The oobleck is a non newtonian fluid, since it can act like both a solid and a liquid at the same time. When vibrations are applied through music, the cornstarch is able to hold its shape.  

Source

When dry ice (frozen carbon dioxide) melts, it doesn’t melt into a liquid like the ice you put in drinks. Instead, it goes through a process called Sublimation. The dry ice changes from a solid to gas with no intermediate liquid phase!
In this GIF, dry ice floats on water. You can see it subliming by the gas diffusing from the dry ice!
Source: quetevala 

When dry ice (frozen carbon dioxide) melts, it doesn’t melt into a liquid like the ice you put in drinks. Instead, it goes through a process called Sublimation. The dry ice changes from a solid to gas with no intermediate liquid phase!

In this GIF, dry ice floats on water. You can see it subliming by the gas diffusing from the dry ice!

Source: quetevala 

Explainer Spotlight - Shannon MacColl

As a young girl, Shannon wanted to invent a bus-boat-plane to provide transportation for people with disabilities. At that time, she didn’t realize that design and philanthropy would be a part of her life.

Now she works at the New York Hall of Science (nysci) as a Design Lab Resident. Where she exposes youth to the basics of design. Her work helps increase interest in engineering.

In the future, Shannon wants to work in Emergency Management. Where she can use her design skills and passion for humanitarianism.

*Update*

Shannon was recently accepted into grad school! She’ll be attending Baruch College and studying Public Administration.

Yay Shannon!

The Pleiades star cluster (M45) - also known as the Seven Sisters!

This group of 800 stars was formed about 100 million years ago. It is located 410 light years away from Earth in the constellation Taurus. (Each light year is about 6 trillion miles).

The hot blue glow of the brightest stars signifies that they were formed within the last 100 million years, and that they are very luminous and will burn out quickly (like a blue flame).

Scientists believe that these beautiful stars will live more than 200 million years before they leave forever. 

This photo was taken by astrophotographer Chuck Manges. Source